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View the full list Ethiopia tends to conjure images of sprawling dusty deserts, bustling streets in Addis Ababa or the precipitous cliffs of the Simien Mountains – possibly with a distance runner bounding along in the background.

Yet the country is also one of the most volcanically active on Earth, thanks to Africa’s Great Rift Valley, which runs right through its heart.

Rifting is the geological process that rips tectonic plates apart, roughly at the speed your fingernails grow.

In Ethiopia this has enabled magma to force its way to the surface, and there are over 60 known volcanoes.

Many have undergone colossal eruptions in the past, leaving behind immense craters that pepper the rift floor. Visit them and you find bubbling mud ponds, hot springs and scores of steaming vents.

This steam has been used by locals for washing and bathing, but underlying this is a much bigger opportunity.

The surface activity suggests extremely hot fluids deep below, perhaps up to 300°C–400°C.

Drill down and it should be possible access this high temperature steam, which could drive large turbines and produce huge amounts of power.

This matters greatly in a country where 77% of the population has no access to electricity, one of the lowest levels in Africa.